ARCHIVE: On whether or not to repeal; a briefing on the debate surrounding the Human Rights Act and a UK Bill of Rights

[First Published on Tuesday 4th October 2011]

The following post was first published on ConSoc’s previous site. It is recorded here as a window onto issues as they were at the time. For more up to date news on the Constitution and Constitutional reform, make sure to follow the ConSoc blog.

This week, as senior politicians from both sides of the coalition express differences of opinion regarding the future of the 1998 Human Rights Act and the prospect of a new UK Bill of Rights, we present some of the best recent writing on the issue as well as some useful background information.

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ARCHIVE: Libel judge defends privacy law

[First Published on Monday 15th March 2010]

The following post was first published on ConSoc’s previous site. It is recorded here as a window onto issues as they were at the time. For more up to date news on the Constitution and Constitutional reform, make sure to follow the ConSoc blog.

The controversial libel judge at the centre of a storm over the development of privacy law in the UK has hit back at his tabloid critics. Justice Eady, who rose to notoriety after punishing the News of the World for publishing intimate photos of Formula 1 boss Max Mosely’s private life, accused tabloids of having a vested interest in stunting privacy for financial gain. 

He also warned that in relation to the ruling that “it is wise to guard against the drawing of general conclusions from the specific findings in one case”. 

The judge, speaking at the inaugural lecture of the Centre for Justice, Law and Journalism at City University also noted that the Guardian was yet to be sued in a privacy case despite doing investigative journalism. He insisted that judges are not responsible for creating privacy law out of thin air but are just interpreting the Human Rights Act as approved by parliament.

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12th January 2001

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